Wednesday, February 12, 2014

Simplicity - is it just an ideal?

A simple life. Free of clutter. Unnecessary commitments. Unhindered service. No junk.

Does this life even exist?

We visited a monastery today with our home school group. Wow, they have a lot going for them! It caused me to pause again and wonder why I do what I do. Why I have what I have.

It's a desire that goes deep. I have websites pinned about simplicity, I've read books about it, I subscribe to blogs about it --

When the reality is that I'm in the middle of a life that's anything but.

Four kids. Educating, feeding, and clothing them. Family. Friends. Hobbies. Ministries.


It's not simple.

So what can I make simple?

Do I say no to everything non-essential?

Or do I embrace the wild ride, knowing it's only a season?

So many thoughts. What do you think?

Me? I'll have to think later. It's time to make dinner.

Monday, February 3, 2014

The Roadside Prayer Warrior

Below is a true story of events surrounding Lee's motorcycle accident.

     Jay sat in his car, frustrated with the wreck that occurred two car lengths ahead of him. His fuel warning light was blinking red, and he thought, Great, I'm going to run out of gas and be stuck on the highway. He tried to observe the cause of the wreck, but two semi trucks had maneuvered in front of the scene, blocking his view. 
      After texting a friend that he might be in need of some help, he heard a different reply.
      "You are a pastor. Go pray."
     It was a voice that he knew he should listen to. So with cars crammed around, in front, and behind him, he left his vehicle and walked up to the scene.
     It was a motorcycle accident. The body looked gruesome, but he was alive. A military man stood nearby with the injured man's wallet held in a firm grip. The EMTs were on their way.
     And Jay prayed.
     He prayed until the motorcyclist was in the ambulance and traffic began to move. Jay had been on his way to the hospital anyway, so after visiting his friend, he decided to swing by the ER, just in case.
     "Are you his pastor?" the nurse asked.
     "I'm a pastor," he replied, truthfully.
     Then a woman walked in -- the man's wife -- unaware of whether her husband had skinned his knee or lost all his limbs... or worse.
     Jay told the story of what he had seen. They hugged. They prayed. They cried.
     She felt the comfort of God. That her Father sent someone - a roadside prayer warrior - to intercede for her husband when she couldn't be there herself.


We met up with Jay Harvey again yesterday, and Lee was able to officially meet him (while conscience) and thank him. He's the pastor of Pendleton Christian Church, and he used this story among others to talk to his congregation about listening to God's voice. It was a good reminder for myself as well. The nudge to make a phone call. The urge to go help. That feeling that I should pray for someone.

Lee and I are both very thankful that Jay was listening.